Photo by Elaine Romano.

Photo by Elaine Romano.

 

Helen Lin, born and raised in New York, is interested in using multi-media narratives to explore and observe how people connect to each other. She expresses the human relationship to objects through cuteness. Her work proposes that finding an object cute is a way of establishing dominance or ownership over it. This interaction encompasses both inanimate and animate. For example, an illustration of a cartoon injured animal can invoke the same feelings within the viewer as a newborn baby. Cuteness can provoke empathy, but it can also reflect the viewer’s uglier or sadistic desire to maintain power over the more vulnerable, weaker object. How can an inanimate object become a vessel for sentimental value and how can the object itself evolve as a result of it? Can attachment for objects act as proxies for other feelings that we can’t let go of?

Helen studied Art and Archaeology: Studio Arts with a minor in East Asian Studies at Princeton University. She is also a member of printjob press, an independent publishing initiative interested in using the tools of intervention, production, and dissemination to understand ourselves and the world.

Contact: helenlinart@gmail.com